How to Identify Black, Red Angus Cattle

The Black Angus cattle is also known as Aberdeen Angus. Common nicknames are Hummlies or Doddies. The cattle’s origin is traced to Scotland with distribution in South America. It is also found in Southern Africa, Europe, North America and Australia.
The solid black breed is farmed for its beef, hide. The red variety are identified as Red Angus because of the red color with white udder. Although the Black Angus and Red Angus share the same genetic markers they are regarded as separate species.
Top Producers
Top producers of the cattle are the United States of America, Scotland. Others include Australia, Argentina, Canada and Germany.
• United States of America
• Scotland
• Australia
• Argentina
• Canada
• Germany
• Southern Africa
• North Africa
How to Identify Black, Red Angus Cattle
The hardy cow weighs 550 kilograms, bull 860 kilograms. The natural color is black however red Angus are now commonplace.
Regarded as a medium sized cattle a common characteristic is the large muscle content. While one in four calves suffer a recessive genetic defect. They have a high degree of marbling, modest thick muscles and no hump on neck exceeding 5cm.
Other features are black or red color, free of capillary rupture, fine marbling texture. Commercial considerations include less than 1000 pounds hot carcass weight. With less than 10 -16 square-inch ribeye area, perky-long ears and shorthorns.
Characteristics
• cow weighs 550 kilograms
• bull 860 kilograms
• black or red color
• medium sized cattle
• large muscle content
• calves suffer a recessive genetic defect
• high degree of marbling
• modest thick muscles
• no hump on neck exceeding 5cm
• free of capillary rupture
• fine marbling texture
• less than 1000 pounds hot carcass weight
• less than 10 -16 square-inch ribeye area
• perky-long ears
• shorthorns
Uses
Crossbreeding is common to reduce the defective genetic treat in calves. The primary use of the Angus cattle is beef production. The meat is superior in quality and highly sort in different markets. Maturity and Breeding

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